The 10 Best Foods High in Zinc + Printable One Page Sheet

Zinc is an essential mineral required by the body for maintaining a sense of smell, keeping a healthy immune system, building proteins, triggering enzymes, and creating DNA. Zinc also helps the cells in your body communicate by functioning as a neurotransmitter. A deficiency in zinc can lead to stunted growth, diarrhea, impotence, hair loss, eye and skin lesions, impaired appetite, and depressed immunity. Conversely, consuming too much zinc can lead to nausea, vomiting, loss of appetite, abdominal cramps, diarrhea, and headaches in the short term, and can disrupt absorption of copper and iron in the long term. If you have a zinc deficiency, then animal foods are better sources of zinc than plant foods.

Foods high in zinc include oysters, beef, lamb, toasted wheat germ, spinach, pumpkin seeds, squash seeds, nuts, dark chocolate, pork, chicken, beans, and mushrooms. The current daily value (DV) for Zinc is 15mg.

Below is a list of the top ten foods highest in zinc by common serving size, for more, see the list of high zinc foods by nutrient density, and the extended list of zinc rich foods.
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Top 10 High Zinc Foods

#1: Seafood (Cooked Oysters)
Zinc in 100gPer 3oz (85g)Per 6 Oysters (42g)
78.6mg (524% DV)66.8mg (445% DV)33.0mg (220% DV)
Other Seafood High in Zinc (%DV per 3oz cooked): Crab (43%), and Lobster (41%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.



#2: Beef and Lamb (Cooked Lean Beef Shortribs)
Zinc in 100g1 Rack of Ribs (315g)1 Lean Ribeye Fillet (129g)
12.3mg (82% DV)38.7mg (258% DV)14.2mg (95% DV)
Lamb is also a good source of Zinc (%DV per 3oz cooked): Lean Foreshank (49%), Lean Shoulder (46%) and Lean Cubed Lamb for Stewing (37%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.



#3: Wheat Germ (Toasted)
Zinc in 100gPer Cup (113g)Per Ounce (28g)
16.7mg (111% DV)18.8mg (126% DV)4.7mg (31% DV)
Crude or Untoasted Wheat Germ is also a good source of Zinc providing 94% DV per cup. Click to see complete nutrition facts.



#4: Spinach
Zinc in 100g (Cooked)Per Cup (Cooked - 180g)100g (Raw)
0.8mg (5% DV)1.4mg (9% DV)0.5mg (4% DV)
Other Green Leafy Vegetables High in Zinc (%DV per cup): Amaranth Leaves, cooked (8%), and Endive and Radiccio, raw (2%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.



#5: Pumpkin and Squash Seeds
Zinc in 100gPer Cup (64g)Per Ounce (28g)
10.3mg (69% DV)6.6mg (44% DV)2.9mg (19% DV)
Other Seeds High in Zinc (%DV per ounce): Sesame Seeds (19%), Sunflower (10%), Chia (9%), and Flaxseeds (8%). While phytates in seeds lower zinc absorption, they are still considered a good source of zinc.Ref Click to see complete nutrition facts.



#6: Nuts (Cashews)
Zinc in 100g (Roasted)Per Cup (137g)Per Ounce (28g)
5.6mg (37% DV)7.7mg (51% DV)1.6mg (10% DV)
Other Nuts High in Zinc (%DV per ounce): Pine nuts (12%), Pecans (9%), Almonds (6%), Walnuts (6%), Peanuts (6%), and Hazelnuts (5%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.



#7: Cocoa and Chocolate (Cocoa Powder)
Zinc in 100gPer Cup (86g)Per Tablespoon (5g)
6.8mg (45% DV)5.9mg (39% DV)0.3mg (2% DV)
Dark baking Chocolate is also high in Zinc providing 85% DV per cup grated and 19% DV per 29g square.
Top 5 Benefits of Dark Chocolate.
Click to see complete nutrition facts.



#8: Pork & Chicken (Cooked Lean Pork Shoulder)
Zinc in 100gPer Steak (147g)Per 3oz (85g)
5.0mg (33% DV)7.4mg (49% DV)4.3mg (28% DV)
Chicken is also High in Zinc providing 15% DV per cooked drumstick. Click to see complete nutrition facts.



#9: Beans (Cooked Chickpeas)
Zinc in 100gPer Cup (164g)Per 3oz (85g)
1.5mg (10% DV)2.5mg (17% DV)1.3mg (9% DV)
Other Beans High in Zinc (%DV per cup cooked): Baked Beans (39%), Adzuki (27%), and Kidney Beans (12%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.



#10: Mushrooms (Cooked White Mushrooms)
Zinc in 100gPer Cup Pieces (156g)Per Mushroom (12g)
0.9mg (6% DV)1.4mg (9% DV)0.1mg (1% DV)
Other Mushrooms High in Zinc (%DV per Cup Pieces): Morel, raw (9%), Brown, raw and Portabella, grilled (5%), Oyster, raw (4%), and White, raw (2%). Four Dried Shitake mushrooms contain 8% DV and 4 raw shitake contain 4% DV. Click to see complete nutrition facts.


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Printable One Page Sheet

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A printable list of the top 10 foods high in zinc.

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Health Benefits of Zinc

High Risk Groups for a Zinc Deficiency

Click each heading below for more information from HealthAliciousNess.com

#1: Oysters (Cooked)78.6mg (524% DV) per 100 grams66.8mg (445% DV) per 3oz (85 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Oysters
#2: Wheat Germ (Toasted)16.7mg (111% DV) per 100 grams4.7mg (31% DV) per ounce (28 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Wheat Germ
#3: Beef (Lean, Cooked)12.3mg (82% DV) per 100 grams38.7mg (258% DV) per piece (315 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Beef
#4: Veal Liver (Cooked)11.9mg (79% DV) per 100 grams8.0mg (53% DV) per slice (67 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Veal Liver
#5: Pumpkin & Squash Seeds (Roasted)10.3mg (69% DV) per 100 grams2.9mg (19% DV) per ounce (28 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Pumpkin & Squash Seeds
#6: Sesame Seeds10.2mg (68% DV) per 100 grams2.9mg (19% DV) per ounce (28 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Sesame Seeds
#7:Dark Chocolate3.3mg (22% DV) per 100 grams0.9mg (6% DV) per ounce (28 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Dark Chocolate
#8: Dried Herbs & Spices (Chervil)8.8mg (59% DV) per 100 grams0.2mg (1% DV) per Tablespoon (2 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Herbs & Spices
#9: Lamb (Lean, Cooked)8.7mg (58% DV) per 100 grams7.4mg (49% DV) per 3oz (85 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Lamb
#10: Peanuts (Roasted) 3.3mg (22% DV) per 100 grams0.9mg (6% DV) per ounce (28 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Peanuts

Fortified Cereals (List of High Zinc Cereals)52mg (345% DV) per 100 gram serving15.5mg (103% DV) per cupClick to compare nutrition facts for various cereals
Low Fat Yogurt with Fruit0.7mg (4% DV) per 100 gram serving1.6mg (11% DV) per cup (245 grams)0.8mg (5% DV) per 1/2 cup (113 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Low Fat Yogurt with Fruit
Milk0.4mg (3% DV) per 100 gram serving1mg (7% DV) per cup (244 grams)3.9mg (26% DV) per 1 quart serving (976 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Milk
Chicken Breast1mg (7% DV) per 100 gram serving1.4mg (9% DV) per cup (140 grams)0.9mg (6% DV) for half a chicken breast (86 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Chicken Breast
Cheddar Cheese3.1mg (21% DV) per 100 gram serving3.5mg (23% DV) per cup (113 grams)0.9mg (6% DV) per ounce(oz) (28 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Cheddar Cheese
Mozzarella2.9mg (19% DV) per 100 gram serving3.3mg (22% DV) per cup (112 grams)0.8mg (5% DV) per ounce(oz) (28 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Mozzarella
Watermelon Seeds10.2mg (68% DV) per 100 gram serving11.1mg (74% DV) per cup (180 grams)2.9mg (19% DV) per ounce (28 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Watermelon Seeds
Venison (Cooked)8.6mg (58% DV) per 100 gram serving7.3mg (49% DV) per 3oz (85 grams)25.3mg (169% DV) per roast (293 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Venison
Veal7.4mg (49% DV) per 100 gram serving6.3mg (42% DV) per 3oz (85 grams)12.9mg (86% DV) per piece (174 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Veal
Fortified Peanut Butter15.1mg (101% DV) per 100 gram serving39.0mg (260% DV) per cup (258 grams)4.8mg (32% DV) per 2 Tablespoons (32 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Fortified Peanut Butter
Alfalfa Sprouts0.9mg (6% DV) per 100 gram serving0.3mg (2% DV) per cup (33 grams)0.1mg (1% DV) per 2 Tablespoons (6 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Alfalfa Sprouts
Asparagus (Cooked)0.6mg (4% DV) per 100 gram serving1.1mg (8% DV) per cup (180 grams)0.4mg (2% DV) per 4 Spears (60 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Asparagus
Rice Bran6.0mg (40% DV) per 100 gram serving7.1mg (48% DV) per cup (118 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Rice Bran
Hearts of Palm3.7mg (25% DV) per 100 gram serving2.1mg (14% DV) per 2 oz (54grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Hearts of Palm
Seaweed (Kelp)1.2mg (8% DV) per 100 gram serving0.1mg (1% DV) per 2 Tablespoons (10 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Kelp Seaweed
Napa Cabbage (Cooked)0.1mg (1% DV) per 100 gram serving0.2mg (1% DV) per cup (109 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Napa Cabbage
Green Peas1.2mg (8% DV) per 100 gram serving1.9mg (13% DV) per cup (160 grams)1.5mg (6% DV) per half cup (80 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Green Peas
Sesame Seeds (Tahini)10.5mg (70% DV) per 100 gram serving1.5mg (10% DV) per tablespoon (14 grams)2.9mg (20% DV) per 1 ounce serving (28 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Sesame Seeds (Tahini)
Flat Fish (Flounder or Sole)0.6mg (4% DV) per 100 gram serving0.8mg (5% DV) per fillet (127 grams)0.5mg (4% DV) per 3 ounce serving (85 grams)Click to see complete nutrition facts for Flat Fish (Flounder or Sole)


  • Oysters, liver, lamb, and cheese are high cholesterol foods which should be eaten in moderate amounts and avoided by people at risk of heart disease or stroke.
  • Sesame Seeds, Pumpkin Seeds, Squash Seeds, and Peanuts are high calorie foods and should beeaten in moderate amounts by people with a high body mass index.
  • Zinc suppliments have adverse reactions with the following medications:
    • Antibiotics - Certain antibiotics like quinolone antibiotics (such as Cipro) and tetracycline antibiotics (such as Achromycin and Sumycin) inhibit the absorption of zinc in the digestive tract.
    • Penicillamine - Zinc reduces the absorption of Penicillamine, which is used by people suffering from rheumatoid arthritis. Taking zinc suppliments two hours before or after intake of Penicillamine solves this problem.

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Data Sources and References

  1. USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 20.
  2. Office Of Dietary Supplements Fact Sheet
  3. Wintergerst ES, Maggini S, Hornig DH. Contribution of selected vitamins and trace elements to immune function. Ann Nutr Metab 2007;51:301-23.
  4. Institute of Medicine, Food and Nutrition Board. Dietary Reference Intakes for Vitamin A, Vitamin K, Arsenic, Boron, Chromium, Copper, Iodine, Iron, Manganese, Molybdenum, Nickel, Silicon, Vanadium, and Zinc. Washington, DC: National Academy Press, 2001.
  5. Beck FW, Prasad AS, Kaplan J, Fitzgerald JT, Brewer GJ. Changes in cytokine production and T cell subpopulations in experimentally induced zinc-deficient humans. Am J Physiol 1997;272:E1002-7.
  6. Bahl R, Bhandari N, Hambidge KM, Bhan MK. Plasma zinc as a predictor of diarrheal and respiratory morbidity in children in an urban slum setting. Am J Clin Nutr 1998;68 (2 Suppl):414S-7S.
  7. Brooks WA, Santosham M, Naheed A, Goswami D, Wahed MA, Diener-West M, et al. Effect of weekly zinc supplements on incidence of pneumonia and diarrhoea in children younger than 2 years in an urban, low-income population in Bangladesh: randomised controlled trial. Lancet 2005;366:999-1004.
  8. Meydani SN, Barnett JB, Dallal GE, Fine BC, Jacques PF, Leka LS, et al. Serum zinc and pneumonia in nursing home elderly. Am J Clin Nutr 2007;86:1167-73.
  9. Black RE. Zinc deficiency, infectious disease and mortality in the developing world. J Nutr 2003;133:1485S-9S.
  10. Prasad AS, Beck FW, Bao B, Snell D, Fitzgerald JT. Duration and severity of symptoms and levels of plasma interleukin-1 receptor antagonist, soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor, and adhesion molecules in patients with common cold treated with zinc acetate. J Infect Dis 2008 ;197:795-802.
  11. Turner RB, Cetnarowski WE. Effect of treatment with zinc gluconate or zinc acetate on experimental and natural colds. Clin Infect Dis 2000;31:1202-8.
  12. Eby GA, Halcomb WW. Ineffectiveness of zinc gluconate nasal spray and zinc orotate lozenges in common-cold treatment: a double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial. Altern Ther Health Med 2006;12:34-8.
  13. Wintergerst ES, Maggini S, Hornig DH. Contribution of selected vitamins and trace elements to immune function. Ann Nutr Metab 2007;51:301-23.
  14. Black RE. Therapeutic and preventive effects of zinc on serious childhood infectious diseases in developing countries. Am J Clin Nutr 1998;68:476S-9S.
  15. Bhutta ZA, Bird SM, Black RE, Brown KH, Gardner JM, Hidayat A, et al. Therapeutic effects of oral zinc in acute and persistent diarrhea in children in developing countries: pooled analysis of randomized controlled trials. Am J Clin Nutr 2000;72:1516-22.
  16. Lukacik M, Thomas RL, Aranda JV. A meta-analysis of the effects of oral zinc in the treatment of acute and persistent diarrhea. Pediatrics 2008;121:326-36.
  17. Fischer Walker CL, Black RE. Micronutrients and diarrheal disease. Clin Infect Dis 2007;45 (1 Suppl):S73-7.
  18. Van Leeuwen R, Boekhoorn S, Vingerling JR, Witteman JC, Klaver CC, Hofman A, et al. Dietary intake of antioxidants and risk of age-related macular degeneration. JAMA 2005;294:3101-7.