Blackberries

Blackberries (Rubus Fruticosus) (aka: brambles, and dewberries) are soft, black, mushy fruits composed of a cluster of many round small balls which can sometimes contain seeds.

Health Benefits of Blackberries

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How to choose Blackberries

Look for bright vibrant blackberries which show no signs of stickiness, wilting, or molding. Try to get a sample to taste.

Climate and origin

Perhaps native to both Europe and North America, blackberries grow best in temperate to sub-tropical climates (zones 5-8 in the U.S.). Certain varieties have been adapted to grow in even warmer or cooler conditions.

Taste

Depending on type and variety, blackberries can have a mushy sweet taste to a gritty sour/bitter taste.

Miscellaneous information

Blackberries were known in the time of ancient Greeks who valued them for their medicinal properties believing they alleviated pains of the throat and mouth, and that they could prevent gout.

Similar tasting produce

Blueberries, Raspberries,

Recipes using Blackberries

Blackberry Apple Almond Salad

Natural vitamins, minerals, and nutrients found in Blackberries + Complete Nutrition Facts

Vitamin C | Vitamin K | Vitamin E | Manganese |

Click here to compare these nutrition facts with other fruits.
Nutrition Facts
Blackberries raw              
Serving Size 100g
Calories 43
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 0.49g1%
    Saturated Fat 0.014g0%
Cholesterol 0mg~%
Sodium 1mg0%
Total Carbohydrate 9.6g3%
    Dietary Fiber 5.3g21%
    Sugar 4.9g~
Protein 1.4g~
Vitamin A4%Vitamin C35%
Calcium3%Iron3%
*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.
Vitamins  %DV
Vitamin A 214IU4%
    Retinol equivalents 11μg~
    Retinol 0μg~
    Alpha-carotene 0μg~
    Beta-carotene 128μg~
    Beta-cryptoxanthin 0μg~
Vitamin C 21mg35%
Vitamin D 0IU (0μg)~%
    D2 Ergocalciferol ~IU (~μg)
    D3 Cholecalciferol ~IU (~μg)
Vitamin E 1.17mg6%
Vitamin K 19.8μg25%
    K1 - Dihydrophylloquinone 0μg~
    K2 - Menaquinone-4 ~μg~
Vitamin B12 0μg~%
Thiamin 0.02mg1%
Riboflavin 0.026mg2%
Niacin 0.646mg3%
Pantothenic acid 0.276mg3%
Vitamin B6 0.03mg2%
Folate 25μg6%
    Folic Acid 0μg~
    Food Folate 25μg~
    Dietary Folate Equivalents 25μg~
Choline 8.5mg~
Lycopene 0μg~
Lutein+Zeaxanthin 118μg~
Minerals  %DV
Calcium 29mg3%
Iron 0.62mg3%
Magnesium 20mg5%
Phosphorus 22mg2%
Sodium 1mg0%
Potassium 162mg5%
Zinc 0.53mg4%
Copper 0.165mg8%
Manganese 0.646mg32%
Selenium 0.4μg1%
Water 88.15g~
Ash 0.37g~
Fatty Acids
Omega 3 to Omega 6 Ratio0.51
Omega 6 to Omega 3 Ratio1.98
Total Omega 3s94mg
18D3 Linolenic94mg
18D3CN3 Alpha Linolenic(ALA)~mg
18D4 Stearidonic (SDA)0mg
20D3N3 Eicosatrienoic~mg
20D5 Eicosapentaenoic(EPA)0mg
22D5 Docosapentaenoic(DPA)0mg
22D6 Docosahexaenoic(DHA)0mg
Total Omega 6s186mg
18D2186mg
18D2CN6 Linoleic(LA)~mg
18D2CLA Conjugated Linoleic(CLA)~mg
18D3CN6 Gamma-linolenic (GLA)~mg
20D2CN6 Eicosadienoic~mg
20D3N6 Di-homo-gamma-linolenic (DGLA)~mg
20D4N6 Arachidonic (AA)~mg
22D4 Adrenic (AA)~mg
Essential Amino Acids  %RDI
Histidine ~mg~%
Isoleucine ~mg~%
Leucine ~mg~%
Lysine ~mg~%
Methionine ~mg~%
Phenylalanine ~mg~%
Threonine ~mg~%
Tryptophan ~mg~%
Valine ~mg~%
Stats
Percent of Daily CalorieTarget
(2000 calories)
2.15%
Percent Water Composition 88.2%
Protein to Carb Ratio (g/g) 0.15


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